The legal press has been awash recently with stories about admissions to the profession: Kaplan Law School is looking to introduce an admissions test for the Legal Practice Course (LPC); BPP is seeking to open three new law schools in Cambridge, Liverpool and Newcastle; and the College of Law has refused to refund fees to students who never commenced their courses. In themselves, these stories might cause a stir and provoke debate about the commercialism of legal education or open market competition. But together they suggest something more serious.

The legal press has been awash recently with stories about admissions to the profession: Kaplan Law School is looking to introduce an admissions test for the Legal Practice Course (LPC); BPP is seeking to open three new law schools in Cambridge, Liverpool and Newcastle; and the College of Law has refused to refund fees to students who never commenced their courses. In themselves, these stories might cause a stir and provoke debate about the commercialism of legal education or open market competition. But together they suggest something more serious.

The recession has marked the end of a period of rapid expansion in the profession. The heady days of nineties boom are now a distant '“ if fond '“ memory for many firms suffering from n...

Jean-Yves Gilg
Editor
Solicitors Journal

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