If there’s a problem with Adam Chaffer’s book, it’s its title, which is something of a misnomer; if you take the Litigation Handbook bit of the title alone, there’s no doubt that it does what it says on the tin (and does it extremely well): the book’s a very digestible and easily-read summary of the key elements of civil litigation, and it manages to strike the difficult balance of being comprehensive while not confusing the reader with too much detail.

Indeed, the skill of the book in many ways is its simplicity, and Chaffer deserves credit for the accessible and uncomplicated style of the language in the book. Certainly, it represents a much more readable and more comprehensible alternative to the we...

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