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Top of the pop-ups

Alexandra Townsend-Wheeler advises on the legal issues around granting rights to pop-ups and warns both landlords and tenants not to simply choose the quickest and cheapest way forward because the arrangement is short term

2 June 2016

While the 'pop-up' might seem a relatively new phenomenon, it is a concept that has been in use for some time. Traditionally, temporary shops and businesses were launched to coincide with seasonal events, to take advantage of periods of increased footfall and demand for specialist goods, for example in the pre-Christmas trading period. However, the pop-up approach really took hold of the property market following the 2008 recession when, as tenants frequently collapsed into insolvency, landlords were left with high numbers of retail vacancies.

The increasing subsequent success of pop-ups has contributed to a partial revival of the UK's
high streets. The report 'Britain's Pop-Up Retail Economy', issued by the Centre for Economics and Business Research in August 2015, estimates that there are almost 10,500 pop-up shops and businesses across the UK, which employ close
to 26,000 people. At t...

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