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Those who drive others to suicide must be held accountable

It's time to listen to those campaigning for a new offence of inciting homicide, says Lucy Corrin

30 April 2012

Southall Black Sisters are launching a campaign for a new offence of inciting homicide. The case of Nosheen Azam has lead the charity to call for an inquiry into the circumstances that caused her to suffer serious harm and for a new law so that those responsible for driving someone to attempt or commit suicide are held accountable by the criminal justice system. The Guardian reported that an estimated ten women kill themselves every week after repeated abuse according to Home Office statistics.

Would the public reaction had been different if Kiranjit Ahluwalia, unable to escape, had responded to years of physical and psychological abuse by killing herself rather than killing her husband? While we accept that people may be driven by extreme circumstances to kill and this should mitigate their conduct, there are convincing arguments that those who drive others to harm themselves cannot stand back and evade responsibility for their actions with the suggestion that suicide is a â...

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