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Hurdles for PTSD claims against the MoD

Following publication of the Chilcot report, Ahmed Al-Nahhas considers the ministry's failure to follow guidelines during the Iraq war and the potential for civil claims

25 July 2016

After several years and millions of pounds, the Iraq war inquiry chaired by Sir John Chilcot published its report on 6 July 2016. One of the many areas being scrutinised
is the failure of the Ministry of Defence (MoD) to follow the 'harmony guidelines'.

The guidelines were designed by the government to keep military personnel mentally and physically fit, ensuring that the UK maintains an effective fighting force. There are different guidelines for each service (Army, RAF, and Navy), restricting the time that personnel should spend away from their families and stipulating the time they must rest between operational tours.

When observed, the guidelines should reduce the risk of injury and mental strain to personnel.
If they are ignored, research suggests that there is a 20 to 50 per cent greater risk of personnel suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

The report concludes, among other things, that the UK military was alrea...

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