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Does Taser use breach fundamental human rights?

There needs to be a syncronisation of traning for police across the country before Taser use can be regulated properly, says Sophie Khan

8 July 2013

A recent Law Society debate on Tasers was well timed and the first real public interaction on the use of Tasers since they were introduced into the UK in 2003. Since 2008, the number of Taser-related incidents have increased dramatically across the country, especially on the vulnerable. Last year, in Kent, 50 per cent of Taser use was on those suffering from mental health disorder and following a Freedom of Information request by Open World News, it was discovered that a 12-year-old girl from St Helens had been Tasered by Merseyside Police in 2011.

Children fall within a specific risk group, which means that Tasers should only be used on them if there is no other feasible method to restraint them. This is a hard test to satisfy. The elderly, those suffering from epilepsy and pregnant women also fall within this group.

The debate centred around the question of whether Article 3 of the European Convention of Human Rights, that no one has the right ...

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