You are here

R v Paul Hansford

A conviction for conspiracy to cheat the public revenue was safe even though the Crown had not, on compelling public interest grounds, disclosed its source of information that appeared to support the offender’s claim that he had not reported the fraud due to threats of violence. An admission comprising the gist of the information made it plausible, but not likely, that the offender had been threatened and, in any case, there had been an abundance of circumstantial evidence showing the offender’s involvement in the fraud from the start.

9 June 2006

The appellant accountant (H) appealed against his conviction for conspiracy to cheat the public revenue. H had allegedly participated in a diversion fraud centred on a bonded warehouse. He claimed to have been ignorant of the illegal activity until a late stage, and that he had not reported it thereafter because of threats to his family. The Crown cross-examined him on the basis that such threats were a complete fabrication, but afterwards discovered information relevant to the issue. For reasons of public interest the Crown did not wish to disclose its source material and the judge directed the Crown to draw up an admission comprising the gist of the information, which went to the jury, and the judge mentioned it twice in summing up. H was duly convicted. H sought leave to appeal on the ground that his defence had been prejudiced by the judge’s refusal to order disclosure of the source material that supported his claim that he had been threatened. At that point, Customs was alert...

Want to read on?

This article is part of our subscription-based access. Please pick one of the options below to continue.

Already registered? Login to access premium content

SUBSCRIBE for one User

Unlimited access to the entire SJ website for a full year for one user.

  • 10 issues a year delivered to you
  • Digital edition of the magazine for one user – sent to your inbox or accessible through the website
  • Access to premium content on the website
  • Access to the fully searchable online archive of Solicitors Journal, Managing Partner and Private Client Adviser, which spans over 13 years
  • Weekly email newsletter with all the latest news, analysis and features
  • Comment on SJ content and contribute to the SJ community online
  • Advanced search feature
  • Online support
  • Access to SJ app compatible with Android and Apple devices – coming soon!
  • 6 special focuses per year
  • Special offers and discounts on Solicitors Journal and IICJ events

Subscribe

CORPORATE SUBSCRIPTION

Your department or entire firm can subscribe to Solicitors Journal online, providing easy access for all who require it. Discount corporate subscription rates apply, based on number of users.

The Corporate IP Licence includes:

  • Digital copy of the magazine sent to individuals’ inboxes and accessible through the website. Solicitors Journal publishes 10 issues per year
  • Unlimited access to premium content on the website based on IP addresses
  • Unlimited access to the fully searchable online archive of Solicitors Journal, Managing Partner and Private Client Adviser, which spans over 13 years
  • Weekly email newsletter with all the latest news, analysis and features
  • Comment on SJ content and contribute to the SJ community online (username required)
  • Unlimited access to SJ app compatible with Android and Apple devices
  • 6 special focuses per year
  • Special offers and discounts on Solicitors Journal and IICJ events

The Corporate IP Licence is tailored to your firm, making it the most cost effective way for the firm to access Solicitors Journal, and enables the firm to remain compliant with copyright and our Terms and Conditions. This gives you the ability to print and circulate articles within the firm.

To enquire about a Corporate IP Licence for your firm, please contact our Subscriptions Manager on emily.beechey@solicitorsjournal.com.