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Law students expect intellectual stimulation at work

Interesting and varied work cited as a key reason for entering the legal profession

15 October 2012

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By Manju Manglani, Editor (@ManjuManglani)

Law students expect to have interesting, varied and intellectually-challenging work when they enter the legal profession, a recent survey has found.

The three most popular reasons given for wanting to enter the legal profession were interesting and varied work, an interest in the law and intellectual challenge.

Aspiring solicitors expect to earn an average of £37,600 a year, while would-be barristers expect to earn £33,400 a year.

The survey findings are based upon 1,900 responses from students on the College of Law’s Graduate Diploma in Law, Legal Practice Course, Bar Professional Training Course and LL.B degree course.

Interesting and varied work was cited as a motivation for entering the legal profession by 76 per cent of aspiring solicitors and 83 per cent of aspiring barristers.

A further 76 per cent of aspiring solicitors and 79 per cent of aspiring barristers said they expect to be intellectually challenged in their chosen career path.

An interest in the law was cited by 73 per cent of aspiring solicitors and 78 per cent of aspiring barristers as a motivation for entering the legal profession.

Interestingly, 62 per cent of aspiring barristers cited ‘wanting to help people’ as one of the main reasons for entering the legal profession, compared with 48 per cent of aspiring solicitors.

Aspiring barristers seem far less interested in earning potential than prospective solicitors, with nearly half of aspiring barristers citing this as one of the main reasons for entering the legal profession, compared with just under two thirds of aspiring solicitors.

Nearly eight out of ten respondents believe the UK recession will continue for at least another year. However, two thirds are confident that they will successfully gain a foothold in the legal profession after completing their studies.

Sixty-one per cent said the economic uncertainty had no impact on their decision to apply to law school, while 14 per cent said it had made them more likely to study law.

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