You are here

Re B (children)

In care proceedings, where it was alleged that injuries to an 11-month-old child were non-accidental, the judge erred in finding that the mother had exaggerated evidence without giving her an opportunity to deal with that point in evidence. The medical evidence was not such that the only conclusion that could be drawn was that the child’s injuries had been caused by shaking.

30 June 2006

The appellant mother (M) appealed against supervision orders granted to the respondent local authority in relation to her three children. M, her husband (F) and their young children had attended a wedding where a guest accidentally dropped M's baby daughter (J), who was aged 11 months. J was taken to hospital, but subsequently discharged. Over the following few days M took J back to the hospital on two further occasions as she had been vomiting and had had a vacant episode. Investigations eventually revealed subdural haemorrhages, which were estimated to have occurred over two weeks previously and to be too old to have been caused by the fall at the wedding. In police interviews, the parents could offer no other explanation. M subsequently remembered falling onto a paving slab while carrying J about four months previously. The local authority applied for care orders in relation to all the children basing their case on medical evidence that the injuries were consistent with shaking. ...

Want to read on?

This article is part of our subscription-based access. Please pick one of the options below to continue.

Already registered? Login to access premium content

SUBSCRIBE for one User

Unlimited access to the entire SJ website for a full year for one user.

  • 10 issues a year delivered to you
  • Digital edition of the magazine for one user – sent to your inbox or accessible through the website
  • Access to premium content on the website
  • Access to the fully searchable online archive of Solicitors Journal, Managing Partner and Private Client Adviser, which spans over 13 years
  • Weekly email newsletter with all the latest news, analysis and features
  • Comment on SJ content and contribute to the SJ community online
  • Advanced search feature
  • Online support
  • Access to SJ app compatible with Android and Apple devices – coming soon!
  • 6 special focuses per year
  • Special offers and discounts on Solicitors Journal and IICJ events

Subscribe

CORPORATE SUBSCRIPTION

Your department or entire firm can subscribe to Solicitors Journal online, providing easy access for all who require it. Discount corporate subscription rates apply, based on number of users.

The Corporate IP Licence includes:

  • Digital copy of the magazine sent to individuals’ inboxes and accessible through the website. Solicitors Journal publishes 10 issues per year
  • Unlimited access to premium content on the website based on IP addresses
  • Unlimited access to the fully searchable online archive of Solicitors Journal, Managing Partner and Private Client Adviser, which spans over 13 years
  • Weekly email newsletter with all the latest news, analysis and features
  • Comment on SJ content and contribute to the SJ community online (username required)
  • Unlimited access to SJ app compatible with Android and Apple devices
  • 6 special focuses per year
  • Special offers and discounts on Solicitors Journal and IICJ events

The Corporate IP Licence is tailored to your firm, making it the most cost effective way for the firm to access Solicitors Journal, and enables the firm to remain compliant with copyright and our Terms and Conditions. This gives you the ability to print and circulate articles within the firm.

To enquire about a Corporate IP Licence for your firm, please contact our Subscriptions Manager on emily.beechey@solicitorsjournal.com.