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Folk law | RIP Messrs Tulk and Moxhay

Andrew Lugger looks at the history and demise of the restrictive covenant

18 June 2012

“A sort of black smoke covers the city. Under this half-daylight ? 300,000 human beings are ceaselessly at work. The homes of the poor are scattered haphazard around the factories. From this filthy sewer pure gold flows. In Manchester civilised man is turned back almost into a savage” – Alexis de Tocqueville’s description of industrialised Manchester.

The Great Exhibition of 1851 was a triumphant expression of British industrial superiority. The Industrial Revolution had paved the way for Great Britain becoming the workshop of the world but this consequently altered the physical appearance of the British Isles. The population of the countryside declined as people left to find work in the industrial towns and cities which grew in size making land scarce. Different trades jostled for control of the same urban land which led to conflict between certain incompatible land uses in the same locality.

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