You are here

Bloomsburry Family law

News

Self Assessment for the Elderly: How Trusts will be affected

Perhaps the most common form of Will Trust, after provision for the very young, is the provision of an income for an elderly dependent, often the widow. The provision may of course be the simple grant of a life interest or, where substantial sums are involved and other considerations apply, the trustees may have certain discretions. It is estimated that a very substantial proportion of all Will Trusts are administered without professional help, and many of these may have existed for years without the need for formal annual accounts. The income from the trust investments has been mandated to the tenant for life and as often as not the investments have lain undisturbed (save for the occasional take-over or rights issue) from year to year.

Marketing to the Elderly

The elderly now represent an increasingly important sector of the population and with the number of pensioners set to increase by 20% over the next 20 years Ken Hart provides a timely reminder of some well proven marketing techniques that work particularly well with elderly clients

Trust Law in Practice

In a slight departure from his series on Trusts and their uses, Bob Trunchion switches to look at a couple of recent cases where practitioners have come unstuck due to either poorly worded Trust documentation or lack of knowledge of how the schemes work

Pages

Opsray